Minnesota Wine at the Midwestern Table – #WinePW 4

Wine Pairing Weekend #4: Regional Food and Wine Pairings
Wine Pairing weekend is a monthly collaborative event for wine/food bloggers. This month’s theme is “Regional Food and Wine Pairing”.  If you’d like to see what others in our group are doing, scroll to the bottom of the post for links.

Join the #winePW conversation: Follow the #winePW conversation on Twitter throughout the weekend and beyond. If you’re reading this early enough, you can join us for a live Twitter chat on our theme “Regional Food & Wine Pairings” on Saturday, September 13, from 11 a.m. to noon Eastern Time. Questions for the chat are posted here on the #winePW site. You can also visit our group Pinterest board to pin some great pairing ideas for later! Stay tuned for the October Wine Pairing Weekend, which will focus on “Fall Fruits and Wine Pairings” on Saturday, October 11.

Midwestern Regional Wine Pairing

Midwestern Regional Wine Pairing

Minnesota Wine at the Midwestern Table
Until a few years ago, we would have been reluctant to pair a local Minnesota wine with much of any meal; sad, but true.  Minnesota winters routinely feature periods of cold that Vitus Vinifera vines wouldn’t survive.  Our so-called wine grapes didn’t produce much worth drinking.  Then, those crazy Agricultural Researchers at the University of Minnesota turned their eyes away from exclusively working on apples (HoneyCrisp anyone?).  Over a period of many years, they cross-bred cold hardy grapes with various strains of traditional wine grapes. No GMO work here, just traditional cross-breeding.  Eventually, they had some success;  hybrid grapes started to emerge that could stand the cold winters and produce a good tasting wine, too.  Jackpot! We now have:

I have been wanting to go truly local with a meal for some time, so our monthly challenge of a regional food and wine pairing seemed like the right time to jump in.  With the exception of salt, pepper and a bay leaf, everything for this meal was grown or raised within 25 miles of our home.  Cool!

Wine from the Marquette grape, specifically bred for harsh Minnesota winters

Wine from the Marquette grape, specifically bred for harsh Minnesota winters

Parley Lake Winery Marquette 2011 ($25 at the winery)
Eye: Opaque center lightening to garnet at the edge.  Quite dark
Nose: Dark blue/purple fruit.  A little barnyard immediately on opening (behind the fruit).  A touch of herbs.Nose seems a touch sweet, but not overly rich, not candied.
Mouth: Good acidity, not quite tart. Just a bit of tannin.  Good length.  Pretty strong fruit gives the impression of a bit of sweetness, but I don’t think it is actually sweet.  Gives this impression even though it’s not overly ripe.
A very nice wine, we’re happy to have it at the table.

Parley Lake Winery Marquette 2011

Parley Lake Winery Marquette 2011

Midwestern Cuisine
When many people think of Midwestern cuisine, hot dish comes to mind.  Or pot roast.  Summertime?  Pan-fried Walleye in a shore lunch.  Indeed, if I look to my history, there are plenty of comfort foods on the list, like Mom’s “swiss steak”. If you look a little closer, you’ll notice this is a budget version of a braised beef recipe, so why not dress it up just a bit?

Mother Jane's "Swiss Steak"

Mother Jane’s “Swiss Steak”

We’ll depart a bit from french onion soup, go with fresh, local ingredients, and incorporate some of our local wine into the recipe in a very traditional braised beef short ribs meal.

Everything on the plate was grown or raised within 25 miles of the Twin Cities

Everything on the plate was grown or raised within 25 miles of the Twin Cities

Midwestern Food and Wine, a Pairing Success?
This wine pairing was an absolute success.  Using the same wine in the braising liquid as the wine at the table provides a continuity of flavor that makes both the food and the wine sing.  You’d have a tough time placing the wine if you tasted it blind as it had deeper flavor than a typical Pinot Noir, but had a lighter body and less tannins than something like a Cabernet Sauvignon.  The Marquette had sufficient structure and body to handle the rich short ribs with the deeply flavored sauce.  All in all, a very nice meal with a very nice bottle of wine.  Well done University of Minnesota and Parley Lake Winery!

After years of research at the University of Minnesota, we can pair a regional wine with cuisine!

After years of research at the University of Minnesota, we can pair a regional wine with cuisine!

Wine Braised Short Ribs with Heirloom Potatoes and Carrots

Ingredients

  • 2 large cloves of garlic, peeled and crushedwinePW_regional_short_ribs_Parley_Marquette_20140906_21
  • 2 large sprigs of thyme
  • 2 sprigs of rosemary
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/4 tsp whole black peppercorns
  • 1 large square of cheesecloth & kitchen twine
  • 1 750 ml bottle of red wine, we used Marquette
  • 4 lbs. bone-in beef short ribs
  • 1 1/2 tsp kosher saltwinePW_regional_short_ribs_Parley_Marquette_20140907_67
  • 3 Tbsp sunflower oil (local choice)
  • 1 large yellow onion, coarsely chopped
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and coarsely chopped
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 2 roma tomatoes, peeled, de-seeded and chopped
  • 8 oz. beef broth
  • 2 Tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 18 oz. of potatoes, cut into 1″ sections (we like heirloom potatoes when we can find them)
  • 12 carrots, peeled.  Cut the carrots in half lengthwise if they are thick.  Cut in half lengthwise if you like.

Instructions

Day Before Serving:

  • The meat benefits from an overnight soak in the marinade, so start this recipe the day before you will serve it.
  • Take a large square of cheesecloth, double it and place the garlic, thyme, rosemary, bay leaves and peppercorns inside.  Wrap up and tie off with kitchen twine.
  • Pour the bottle of wine into a saucepan, add the cheesecloth bag, and bring to a boil.  Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes, set aside to cool.
  • Put the ribs into a large freezer ziploc bag.  Add the marinade and the cheesecloth bag of herbs.  Seal and put in the refrigerator overnight.  Place the bag in a shallow pan or dish, as some marinade usually leaks out.  Squeeze the bag, turning the ribs a bit every few hours.

Day of Serving

  • Preheat oven to 275° F
  • Remove the ribs from the marinade, and reserve the marinade.
  • Pat the ribs dry with paper towels.winePW_regional_short_ribs_Parley_Marquette_20140907_142
  • Pre-heat a 5-6 qt. dutch oven on the stove-top with medium heat.  Heat 2 Tbsp of oil in the dutch oven.  Place the ribs in the dutch oven, browning them on all sides for 3-4 minutes per side.  Don’t overcrowd the pan.  If you need to brown in 2 batches, that’s fine.  Remove the ribs from the pan and set aside on a plate.
  • Add 1 Tbsp oil, and then add the onions and carrots.  Saute the onions and carrots for 5-8 minutes until translucent and lightly browned.  Add the roma tomatoes, the beef broth and the marinade.
  • Increase the heat to high and bring the liquid to a boil.  Scrape down the sides and bottom of the dutch oven into the marinade.
  • Add the ribs to the dutch oven.  Then place the potatoes around the ribs, then add the sliced carrots on top.
  • Check on the contents every 30 minutes or so.  Carefully turn the ribs each time.  If the liquid has boiled away, add more beef broth or water.
  • Cover with the dutch oven lid and braise for around 3 hours, until the meat is moist and fork tender, and the potatoes and carrots are cooked.
  • Once the meat and vegetables are done, carefully remove them from the dutch oven.  Cover with foil and keep them warm.
  • Squeeze and strain the liquid from the dutch oven.  Discard the chopped vegetables and the cheesecloth herb bag.  Reduce the remaining liquid in the dutch oven over medium heat, scraping the sides and bottom of the dutch oven to release the cooked bits into the liquid.  Add water or broth if needed to produce a concentrated au jus to drizzle over the finished ribs on the plate.

Sources for the ingredients in our meal:

Marquette Red Wine from Parley Lake Winery

Short ribs from Sunshine Harvest Farm

Potatoes and Vegetables from Bossy Acres CSA

Roma tomatoes and herbs from our backyard garden!

Wine Pairing Weekend #4

Be sure to check out these great pairings from my fellow #winePW 4 bloggers!

Culinary Adventures with Camilla posted “Chuletas de Cordero + Tempranillo

Vino Travels — An Italian Wine Blog shared “Piedmont Pleasures

Grape Experiences is pairing “Avantis Estate Malagousia 2013 and Greek Shrimp

Curious Cuisiniere shared “Cheddar Cranberry Grilled Cheese with Door Peninsula Winery’s Peninsula Red

foodwineclick is sharing “Minnesota Wine at the Midwestern Table

Pull That Cork posted “winePW 4: Sicily

Confessions of a Culinary Diva blogged about “New Mexico: Burgers, Bubbles and Beer

Rockin Red Blog shared about “A Rustic Meal in Valpolicella

Cooking Chat blogged about “A Paso Pairing: Grilled Tuna with Halter Ranch Syrah

Join the #winePW conversation: Follow the #winePW conversation on Twitter throughout the weekend and beyond. If you’re reading this early enough, you can join us for a live Twitter chat on our theme “Regional Food & Wine Pairings” on Saturday, September 13, from 11 a.m. to noon Eastern Time. Questions for the chat are posted here on the #winePW site. You can also visit our group Pinterest board to pin some great pairing ideas for later! Stay tuned for the October Wine Pairing Weekend, which will focus on “Fall Fruits and Wine Pairings” on Saturday, October 11.

Why not join us in October? “Fall Fruits and Wine Pairings” on Saturday, October 11.

Comments
12 Responses to “Minnesota Wine at the Midwestern Table – #WinePW 4”
  1. I have heard positive reviews of Marquette but have yet to try it. Your meal sounds delicious!

  2. I’ve been wanting to find more “local” foods/wines. Living in a desert presents challenges with that in the summer. Late Autumn – Spring we have an abundance of fresh fruit and produce, but still am lacking a local “meat” source and wine source. Temecula is about 80 minutes away, and the wines are improving – hoping to find one to love someday soon.

    I love your recap of Minnesota Wines at the Midwestern Table and the care you took in paring and preserving heritage. Coming from Montana, comfort food was what I was raised on and not found often in Southern California.

  3. Nancy Brazil says:

    This pairing looks just delicious. Great recipe and background on Minnesota winemaking. Cheers Jeff!

  4. Great effort to have everything, including wine, come from within 25 miles! Not as easy to do in MN as in some places. Interesting to here about your local wines.

Trackbacks
Check out what others are saying...
  1. […] foodwineclick is sharing “Minnesota Wine at the Midwestern Table“ […]

  2. […] foodwineclick is sharing “Minnesota Wine at the Midwestern Table” […]

  3. […] Grilled Cheese with Door Peninsula Winery’s Peninsula Red“foodwineclick is sharing “Minnesota Wine at the Midwestern Table“Pull That Cork posted “winePW 4: Sicily“Confessions of a Culinary Diva blogged […]

  4. […] Grilled Cheese with Door Peninsula Winery’s Peninsula Red“foodwineclick is sharing “Minnesota Wine at the Midwestern Table“Pull That Cork posted “winePW 4: Sicily“Confessions of a Culinary […]

  5. […] refrain as folks dug into this savory dish. In developing my plan for the dish, I referred to this recipe Jeff from foodwineclick […]



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