Louis Jadot on Both Sides of the Pond #Winophiles

French Winophiles Explore Oregon to Bourgogne (Burgundy) Connection
This month, our French Winophiles are taking a virtual trip from Bourgogne to the Willamette Valley in Oregon, shadowing the trips made by some well known Bourgogne wineries, Domaine Joseph Drouhin and Domaine Louis Jadot. Join our group as we search for French influence in the Willamette Valley! Take a look further down in this post for titles and links to fifteen thoughts on our topic of the month!

Bourgogne (Burgundy) is located in the center of France, the main grapes are Chardonnay and Pinot Noir

Bourgogne (Burgundy)
Bourgogne is a fascinating region. Because of the Napoleonic inheritance laws, land is passed down equally divided between all surviving children. This means the entire region is a patchwork of tiny plots of land, worked by a very large number of growers. Their vineyard holdings too small to age and bottle the wines themselves, growers turned to négociants who would purchase grapes or newly made wines, vinify and age them, then market them to the world.

One of Maison Louis Jadot’s own vineyards, Rugiens in the village of Pommard

Maison Louis Jadot
Maison Louis Jadot
, started commercially in 1859, is one of Bourgogne’s large négociants. Today, Louis Jadot makes wine from their own vineyards as well as purchasing grapes and new wines from small growers all over Bourgogne and Beaujolais.

Résonance – Louis Jadot Outpost in Willamette Valley
In 2013, a new venture was founded in Oregon at Résonance. Oregon offers some similarities to the Bourgogne region with similar latitude, established as an excellent source of both Pinot Noir and more recently, Chardonnay. Oregon is no Bourgogne copy, however. Climate and soils are quite different, so we can expect the wines to have similarities as well as differences. Vive la Différence!

Disclosure: The Resonance Pinot Noir is a sample, no other compensation was provided. I purchased the Louis Jadot wine at retail. All opinions expressed are mine.

Louis Jadot Côte de Beaune-Villages red Burgundy made of 100% Pinot Noir

Louis Jadot Côte de Beaune-Villages 2017 ($49 locally or online here) 13.5% 100% Pinot Noir sourced from village level parcels in the Côte de Beaune. Village level wines are classified as part of the top 50% of the vineyards in Bourgogne.

Eye: Pale ruby
Nose: medium minus intensity aromas of white blossoms, ripe strawberries and cherries, a touch of smoke and forest floor.
Mouth: dry, medium plus acidity, medium minus fine grained tannins, medium alcohol, medium body with a lean texture, medium finish. Medium minus flavors of white blossoms, ripe strawberries and cherries, a touch of smoke and forest floor.

Louis Jadot’s outpost in the new world, this is Résonance wines Découverte Vineyard Pinot Noir.

Résonance Pinot Noir “Découverte Vineyard” Dundee Hills AVA 2017 (Willamette Valley) (sample, $65 or online here) 13.5% 100% Pinot Noir sourced from the Découverte (Discovery!) Vineyard in the Dundee Hills AVA. This is a single vineyard wine, with grapes coming from just one vineyard, not multiple sites.

Eye: Pale ruby
Nose: Medium minus aromas of ripe cherries and strawberries, hint of vanilla far in the background, clean earth and forest floor.
Mouth: Dry, medium plus acidity, medium minus fine grained tannins, medium body with a lean texture, medium alcohol, medium plus finish. Flavors closely mirror the nose, with generally restrained fruit and clean earth. The wine texture is an important component.

Familial Resemblance
Observations considering the two wines: I was impressed by how similar the intent/approach was between these two wines. Clean and understated, both wines prefer texture over bold fruit flavors with subtle use of oak. The Résonance wine shows a bit more fruit compared to the Louis Jadot. While many Bourgogne wines exhibit quite obviously earthy characteristics, the Louis Jadot wine was spotless with a bit of earth but very clean.

Winophiles Virtual Oregon Visits
Take a look below at all the great ideas for exploring Bourgogne-influenced-Oregon with our Winophiles. If you see this soon enough, please join our chat on Saturday, Dec. 19 10-11am CST on Twitter at #Winophiles. We’d love to hear your thoughts!

Pinot Noir is a great choice with earthy mushrooms in a wine sauce with chicken

Chicken and Madeira Mushrooms

I ran across a good looking recipe online, and when I looked a little closer, I saw it was linked to an older version from Epicurious, here . The original uses Marsala wine. Because I had Madeira in the house, I decided to use it in lieu of Marsala (which after all, was a counterfeit wine to begin with, likely mimicking Madeira). So please feel free to go to the original source recipe linked above.  What follows below is what I made.

Ingredients

  • 2 whole boneless skinless chicken breasts  (about 1.5 pounds), each breast halved.
  • 1  Tbsp extra virgin olive oil (EVOO)
  • 3  Tbsp butter
  • 1 onion, halved and sliced thinly
  • 3/4 pound white button mushrooms, sliced thinly
  • 1/2 cup Sercial Madeira (medium-dry)
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 2 Tbsp minced fresh parsley leaves

Instructions

  • Brown chicken in a large skillet in 1Tbsp butter and 1 Tbsp EVOO over medium heat, transferring chicken to a platter once browned
  • Saute mushrooms and onions in the same skillet in the remaining butter/oil mixture. Continue cooking until mushrooms have released most of their water.
  • Add the Madeira to the onion/mushroom mixture and cook until the Madeira is nearly all evaporated.
  • Add the chicken broth, continuing to cook.
  • Add the chicken pieces back to the pan, cover and simmer for 15 minutes, turning the chicken once.
  • Remove the chicken pieces to a platter
  • Increase the heat to medium and reduce the mushrooms and sauce by about half to a nice sauce consistency.
  • Finish with 1 Tbsp of butter, melted into the sauce
  • Serve the chicken and sauce topped with the fresh parsley
  • We served our chicken on a bed of freshly roasted spaghetti squash.

Comments
23 Responses to “Louis Jadot on Both Sides of the Pond #Winophiles”
  1. culinarycam says:

    That looks like an amazing dinner, Jeff! I might just have to try this soon, despite my youngest being fungi-averse.

  2. robincgc says:

    The dish looks delicious and I appreciate the thoughtful comparisons between the two wines!

    You have also reminded me that I should pick up some spaghetti squash!

  3. wendyklik says:

    I love that you compared the old world/new world wines. Great article and the recipe sounds luscious.

  4. Lynn says:

    Nice to taste and compare the wines together. Betting you blind tasted them?!? Since I used my Coravin, plan on doing the same with Drouhin. Happy holidays to you and Julie!

  5. Jill Barth says:

    This was so much fun, and it’s interesting to examine this connection between Bourgogne and Oregon. I love your images of the Jadot vineyards. Thank you Jeff!

  6. Love the comparison and pairing. When opening Pinot, ‘rooms rule!

  7. Great comparison of the new world and old world Pinot Noir wines. Nice pairing, I make a counterfeit “Marsala” version in the slow cooker. I love that you served it on spaghetti squash, great idea!

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