Dip Your Biscotti in Montefalco Sagrantino Passito #ItalianFWT

Italian Food, Wine and Travel Group Savors Passito Wines
Wondering what a passito wine is? Stick around and find out, with lots of ideas from our Italian Food, Wine and Travel group! This month, we’re diving into sweet wines made from grapes that have been harvested, then laid in the sun or someplace warm to shrivel up and dry out. The grape juice is concentrated by drying, and when the wine is made, an intense, sweet wine results, perfect for dessert. Passito wines are made in many locations in Italy, and you’ll learn about many of them by jumping to the links to the other blog posts, farther down on this page.

Disclosure: The winery photos are from a press trip I attend in February 2019 which was sponsored by the Consorzio Tutela Vini Montefalco. The wine for this post was provided as a sample by the Colle Ciocco winery. No other compensation was involved. All opinions expressed are mine alone.

Colle Ciocco Winery in Montefalco Italy
Established in 1935, Colle Ciocco is one of the oldest continuously operating wineries in Montefalco. As many others in Umbria, they grow grapes and olive trees, and they produce wines and olive oils. And, finally, they ship their spent grape pomace out to the Berta distillery to be made into their grappa! If you travel to Montefalco (highly recommended), you can visit and sample their products yourself!

Colle Ciocco Montefalco Sagrantino Passito DOCG 2010 (sample, 20€ at the winery or online here) 14.5%abv

From the winery: “The most traditional of Montefalco wines, obtained from the vinification of selected Sagrantino grapes, left to dry for over three months on racks. Following this process, the yield in wine is extremely small and about 25-30 liters per 100 kg of fresh grapes. After numerous rackings and the maturation of one year in oak barrels, the Sagrantino passito concludes its aging in bottle, where it remains at least twelve months before it can be drunk. It is a wine that has great longevity and that improves its organoleptic characteristics over time.”

Eye: Clear, deep garnet with richly stained legs.
Nose: Clean, medium intensity. Primary aromas of ripe blueberries, blackberries, plums, floral notes of violets, dried herbs – thyme, and black licorice. Secondary aromas are faint, but noted smoke and chocolate. tertiary notes of raisins, leather, forest floor.
Mouth: Medium sweet, medium plus intensity. Medium plus acidity with medium tannins which are fully resolved and fine grained. Medium plus body with high alcohol. Luscious texture with long finish. Flavors mirror the aromas with abundant ripe blueberries, blackberries, plums, raisins, smoke, chocolate and earthy impressions of leather and forest floor.

This is an outstanding quality wine showing excellent complexity with intensity and retaining plenty of fruit after 9 years. Wine is ready to be enjoyed now, but can continue to be enjoyed for another 5 years before fruit begins to fade.

ItalianFWT Bloggers Share Their Passito Secrets
Want to learn more about passito wines from Italy? Take a look at all the good ideas below, and join our chat on Twitter on Saturday Sept. 7 10-11am CDT. Just search for the hashtag: #ItalianFWT

Comments
6 Responses to “Dip Your Biscotti in Montefalco Sagrantino Passito #ItalianFWT”
  1. Vino Travels says:

    I’m sure that was a fabulous trip. I love sagrantino but I don’t think ive had a passito.

  2. crynning says:

    Heck, yeah! I’m ready to find some biscotti and start dipping with this luscious sagrantino! You’re trip sounds incredible!

  3. wendyklik says:

    What a great trip. Thanks so much for sharing it with us. I am not a sweet wine fan but dipping the biscotti is a great idea.

  4. SnarkyWine says:

    Great wine, great region, my favourite grape – and a fabulous way to enjoy biscotti!

  5. Nicole Ruiz Hudson says:

    Biscotti and passito wines are such a great combo! The videos are really fun, particularly love that slightly slow-mo pour with the jazzy music. Very alluring.

  6. Great videos Jeff 🙂 I never visited this winery on the tour this year, I do not think I tasted their passito either. Sounds very good!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: